Posted tagged ‘Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman’

April showers bring May fun

May 2, 2016

by Andrea Powell, HPCCR Marketing Manager

LN Hospice Regatta logo_2015You know that phrase, “April showers bring May flowers”? Well, we got our April showers in Charlotte on Saturday night, didn’t we? They snuck in at the 11th hour (literally), drenching us all with pounding rain along with some serious thunder and lightning.

For Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman, those April showers are bringing not May flowers, but massive amounts of May fun — in the form of the Lake Norman Hospice Regatta Party. The Regatta Party, affectionately known as “the best party on the lake”, is happening this Saturday at the Peninsula Club in Cornelius. The fun will begin at 6:30pm when you can browse the silent auction items while sipping a cocktail and tasting delicious hors d’oeuvres. After a delightful dinner and a stirring presentation, there will be more fun and games and a chance to bid on some amazing live auction items as well.

And, brand new this year, you can purchase a “golden ticket” which gives you the chance to win an unbelievable trip to one of three destinations: Punta Cana Resort in the Dominican Republic, Fairmont Chateau in Lake Louise, Canada, or the Meritage Resort in Napa Valley. We’re only selling 100 of these tickets and half of them have already been purchased so don’t wait too long to capitalize on this opportunity! All trips include $1,000 in spending money and airfare for two. A one in a hundred chance for all of that? Them’s good odds, if you ask me! Golden tickets are available on our website — get yours before they’re all gone!

Your emcees for the evening will be WSOC anchor Allison Latos and WSOC meteorologist Keith Monday. They will charm you throughout the event and keep you well informed of all the goings on — who’s speaking next, when it’s time to win your golden ticket trip (because you are going to win it, right?), and when you need to finalize your silent auction bids.

At this point, all you have to do is buy your ticket, show up, and have a good time. And I’m not a scientist or meteorologist, but if you could equate the severity of those April showers we had on Saturday night to the amount of May fun you’ll have at the Lake Norman Hospice Regatta Party this weekend, I can predict you’re gonna get drenched.

Tickets are $125 and are available on our website. All proceeds benefit Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman.  For more information, contact Nancy Cole at 704.335.4312. 

Special thanks to our most generous presenting sponsors: Huntersville Ford, Kathryn M. Keele, and Lake Norman Transportation Services.

The best in the country

October 7, 2015

by Andrea Powell, HPCCR Marketing Manager

Helen and Christy

Helen listens as Christy sings a hymn.

We received a beautiful, heartfelt letter about a month ago from the daughter of a patient. And it touched us. We get letters all the time, but this one made us particularly proud because it came from “one of our own”; Peggy, the woman who wrote the letter, used to work for a hospice in the great state of New York. That means she understands what we do every day and knows how emotional it is to work for a hospice, caring for patients who are dying and guiding their loved ones through this sacred process.

Peggy wrote that she was honored to “help clients to the end with dignity and without pain; their family’s well-being was of the utmost importance to me, along with meeting any other need they may have had.” So we figured that when it comes to recognizing exceptional care, Peggy was certainly qualified.

Last week, a few of us went to visit Peggy and her mother, Helen, who has been under the care of Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman since February. Helen is bed-bound but in great spirits — kind and loving to her family and her hospice care team. She is a tiny thing with a huge personality. A devout Catholic, she had been closely following the Pope’s United States tour and was happy to talk to those of us in the room about his travels. Helen graciously received our compliments on her beautiful skin and youthful appearance (which belied her 96 years) and she listened with great appreciation as Christy, our VP of Philanthropy (who also happens to have a gorgeous voice), sang her a hymn.

It was a short visit but a rewarding one. Helen has clearly been enjoying her life under the careful and gentle care of Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman. Her daughter Peggy could not tell us enough how impressed she has been with every care team member. In fact, in her letter she wrote, “They give their hearts every day. This team is the best in the country. Yes, I said country, not county!”

So apparently our approval rating is up there with the Pope’s. We’ll take it.

Don’t worry, we’ve planned your Saturday

September 17, 2015

by Andrea Powell, HPCCR Marketing Manger

September is always a busy month here at HPCCR.  As you know, we just had our Hit the Brixx 10K / 5K last weekend.  (And we just missed the cooler weather!  Thanks to everyone who braved the humidity!)  Well, we’re doubling up on events this weekend because, you know, we like to give you a choice when it comes to supporting our organization.

This weekend, you can either shoot guns (safely) or eat appetizers and drink wine.  Or do both.  Your call.

Bull Shooters Logo_30First up is the Shoot For Joy sporting clay fundraiser, an event hosted by the Mecklenburg Bull Shooters.  It starts at 7:30am on Saturday morning.  You can shoot clay targets during the morning session, take a break for lunch (and a raffle!) and then shoot again during the afternoon session.  You can go solo or as a team and all shooting levels are welcome!  For more info, visit the event page on our website.
400x400 BV Taste of Birkdale FB-POSTYour other option is our annual Taste of Birkdale, which supports Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman.  It starts in the afternoon on Saturday (3pm) and you get to sample entrées from some of Birkdale’s best restaurants and wine from Total Wine.  After you’ve enjoyed those delectable treats, you can feast your eyes on fall’s latest must-haves during the fashion show that starts at 5pm at the fountain.  This evening never disappoints.  Check out the Taste of Birkdale page on our website for all the details.

So there you have it.  We’ve planned your weekend for you.  You’re welcome.

For more information about these or any events contact Nancy Cole, Director of Special Events, at colen@hpccr.org or call 704.375.0100.

Goodbye winter, hello Regatta Party!

April 22, 2015

by Andrea Powell, HPCCR Marketing Manager

LN Hospice Regatta logo_2015I just saw on Twitter that they got 9.5 inches of snow in some (quite unlucky) areas of Wisconsin yesterday and today. While I feel very sorry for those poor souls who are dragging out the shovels and the snow blowers yet one more time, I can’t help but feel smug.  It’s finally springtime in the Carolinas and we are enjoying some glorious sunshine, bluebird skies, and dry weather.  Each year when we finally get this gorgeous respite, we also get a tingling of anticipation.  You can almost sense something delightfully fun is in your future.  And it is!  The 15th annual Lake Norman Hospice Regatta Party is coming your way on Saturday, May 2!

If you haven’t purchased your tickets to the “best party on the lake”, you still have a chance because we have a few left (which you can find on our website). The Lake Norman Hospice Regatta Party is an upscale evening at The Peninsula Club in Cornelius and it features delicious food, music, games, an inspirational speaker, and a well-stocked cash bar.  You will also enjoy some amazing items up for bid in the live and silent auctions.  And the best part about the auctions?  You can do your bidding online from the comfort of your seat, using only your smart phone and your cunning, cutthroat strategies to get the items that you want.

Need some incentive to get your tickets?  How about a sneak peek into some of the items up for bid?  We’ve got an unbelievable trip to the Napa Valley which includes a 3-night stay at a fabulous resort and a three-hour gourmet dinner for two on the Napa Valley Wine Train.  This trip also includes round-trip coach class airfare for two.  Yeah, you can just go ahead and sign me up for that one.

We’ve also got a week-long stay in a two bedroom condo (which sleeps eights) in Hilton Head.  One week of hanging out on the beach, listening to the waves, and catching up with your friends (who will adore you for inviting them).

Or maybe you just want a quick getaway to the mountains?  We’ve got a one-night stay at a bed & breakfast in Banner Elk.

Plus, we’ve got golf packages, jewelry, nights at the Grove Park Inn, and a ton more.  To put it simply, there are more than enough reasons for you to get your bidding on at this awesome event.  Not to mention it supports a wonderful organization making a huge impact within its community — Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman.

The party starts at 6:30pm on Saturday, May 2 at the Peninsula Club in Cornelius.  Tickets are $100, which is a tiny investment in the massive amount of fun you’re going to have, especially if you end up outbidding me for the Napa trip.  Now, if you’re coming here from snowy Wisconsin, we’ll probably let you in for free.  You’ve seriously suffered enough.

A HUGE thanks to our generous presenting sponsors: Huntersville Ford, Kathryn Keele, and Lake Norman Transportation Services, Inc.  We sincerely appreciate your amazing support!

To purchase your Lake Norman Hospice Regatta Party tickets, visit the Shop HPCCR page on our website.  For more information, contact Nancy Cole, HPCCR Director of Special Events.

Don’t worry, we’ve planned your Saturday

September 18, 2014

by Andrea Powell, HPCCR Marketing Manger

September is always a busy month here at HPCCR.  As you know, we just had our Hit the Brixx 10K / 5K last weekend.  (What a turnout, by the way!  More participants than ever, despite the soul-crushing humidity!)  Well, we’re doubling up on events this weekend because, you know, we like to give you a choice when it comes to supporting our organization.

This weekend, you can either shoot guns (safely) or eat appetizers and drink wine.  Or do both.  Your call.

Bull Shooters Logo_30First up is the Shoot For Joy sporting clay fundraiser, an event hosted by the Mecklenburg Bull Shooters.  It starts at 8am on Saturday morning.  You can shoot clay targets during the morning session, take a break for lunch (and a raffle!) and then shoot again during the afternoon session.  You can go solo or as a team and all shooting levels are welcome!  For more information, visit the event page on our website.

taste of bv words_2013Your other option is our annual Taste of Birkdale, which supports Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman.  It starts in the afternoon on Saturday (3pm) and you get to sample entrées from some of Birkdale’s best restaurants and wine from Total Wine.  After you’ve enjoyed those delectable treats, you can feast your eyes on fall’s latest must-haves during the fashion show that starts at 7pm at the fountain.  This evening never disappoints.  Check out the Taste of Birkdale page on our website for all the details.

So there you have it.  We’ve planned your weekend for you.  You’re welcome.

 

Heel to heal

August 14, 2013

by Ed Muir, Owner, Southern Herb Company

Editor’s Note:  Ed Muir is a sailor who participated in our Lake Norman Hospice Regatta back in June.  He was a crew member aboard “Temptress”, the Luder 16 that came in 1st place in the Cruising Class division.  Afterward, Ed wrote a beautiful recap of the event.  He went to the Regatta thinking the weekend would be all about sailing.  He left the weekend having experienced far more.  To read more of Ed’s blogs, click here.

Temptress, the boat on which Ed Muir was a crewmember

Temptress, the boat on which Ed Muir was a crew member for the LN Hospice Regatta

Last weekend was very special.  I accepted an invitation to crew on a sailboat in a local benefit regatta.  The boat’s owner spent the last four years restoring this antique day-sailor, originally built in 1947, and it’s now looking even better than it did when it first rolled out of the boatyard.  I hadn’t raced in nearly 40 years, but was honored to have been asked.  The boat is the same class as mine and as I am quite familiar with it, it wasn’t a random invitation.  I went into this event and (I am happy to say) came out of it with the mindset that “it’s all about the boat” and determined not to let the racing part get in the way of enjoying it.  This beautiful boat did garner its share of “gawkers”, as my skipper proudly referred to them, and they, too, had a genuine interest in its story. 

The race was hosted by a local yacht club, its two-story un-airconditioned frame structure sitting on a point at the entrance to a bucolic cove on our lake, around which all its facilities are located.  People, families, enthusiasts, and even world-renowned sailors come here to sail, to live sailing, and to share it.  Its stony driveways are unmanicured, its paths worn and natural as they wind through the woods along the shore, its service buildings simple and functional, yet it all looks kempt.  A double-breasted blue blazer would be about as rare here as seeing a power boat in the cove.  Topsiders, those white, rubber-soled leather shoes preferred by sailors were about the only consistent piece of uniform.

The charity benefit was for Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman.  I hadn’t realized that this was a nationally coordinated regatta alliance with 25 independent races and that it raises over $1 million annually for local hospice organizations. 

What I hadn’t counted on, since I knew only a handful of people there, was the human connection.  I enjoyed meeting the people – other sailors, the volunteers, the hospice staff, and others who hosted such a wonderful weekend event.  On Saturday evening, there was a Circle of Light memorial ceremony.  We each took turns lighting our candles and reflecting on whomever we chose to remember.  Some memories were more recent than others and drew fresh tears from an unending well that never seemed to fully dry on the face.  One young woman, full of grace and dressed in a Kelly green dress (odd apparel indeed for a regatta), memorialized her husband.  Later, after dinner, she rose to speak and shared her incredible story; a story that included love, support, and caring from the hospice people with whom she had shared a good chunk of her life over the past year.  She was resolute in her presentation, genuine and deeply appreciative of their impact on her life and that of her husband.

But what struck me most about this woman was her heroism.  I am tired of hearing that we don’t have real hero figures in our world anymore.  If you want to see heroes, turn off your tv sets, your computers, put down your cell phones and books, and simply look at those around you.  This woman, not yet 30, has lost a husband, the father of her only child.  She is strong.  Having gone through this incredible ordeal over the past year or so, and all the pain she has suffered, she is committed to raising her daughter as a single, working parent.  She unselfishly volunteers her time to speak at events like this to promote the virtues of hospice care and its dedicated people and what they have meant to her and her family.  She is the real deal when it comes to heroes.

We won our division’s race that weekend.  The local hospice won big-time with record donations.  The sport of sailing and the spirit of sailors won, as is always the case at a well-run regatta. And I won, having sailed a beautiful boat and having met some incredible people and one young woman in a green dress whom I now see as a real-life action hero.

Shouting from the rooftops

May 23, 2013

by Andrea Powell, HPCCR Electronic Communications Manager

Lori Williamson and her husband, Michael

Knowing about hospice is (in a weird, messed up way) kind of a curse.  Because once you understand the benefits and you see first-hand how comprehensively amazing hospice clinicians are, you get even more frustrated that there are so many misconceptions about it.  Hospice hastens death.  It’s only for the last days and hours of life.  Your loved one will sink away in a drug-induced haze the minute they come under hospice care.  No.  Wrong.  False. 

When you see what a monumental difference hospice makes, you feel an urgent need to share everything about it.  You want everyone who has a seriously ill loved one to look into hospice immediately, even when you know they aren’t yet ready.  Even when you know they’re scared.  And you want to yell from the rooftops about how no one should be scared because hospice care can actually extend life, and that it supports the entire family, and the hospice team will help everyone feel prepared, and it will make what could be a terrible experience actually wonderful and peaceful, and, and, and. . . . 

I could go on for days.   

I myself knew very little about hospice care when I joined Hospice & Palliative Care Charlotte Region.  But in the five years I’ve worked here, I’ve seen a wedding at one of our hospice houses, met veterans, interviewed widows, heard testimonies, and cried buckets of tears.  I’ve cried because the stories are, yes, devastatingly sad, but also because, in their own way, they are excruciatingly beautiful.  The people I talk to could not be more passionate about the experiences they’ve had with hospice.  They could not be more appreciative of the sacred time they had with their loved ones.  They now know what I know.  And they have become our staunchest advocates.

Below is an email that we received last fall from Lori Williamson, whose husband, Michael, was under the care of Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman.  

We give life with a chemotherapy schedule (days 1-7 were chemo with side effects,  followed by days 8-14 in isolation because of low blood cell count) a score of ZERO.

We give life without chemo (which included five holes of golf, a ride in Cobra Sports Car, and a huge family party that included five sons, some wives, and some grandkids, even watching football and baseball games at a crowded sports bar as a family) a score of TEN.

I just want everyone to know that hospice care doesn’t mean I am sitting besides Michael’s bed all day long, holding his hand.  He is up and moving, walking stairs, going on outings, and enjoying life with his family every day.  It just means that we can call and have hospice professionals available 24/7 to help us with everything we need.  The nurses and social workers from Hospice & Palliative Care Lake Norman come to check on us, prescription drugs arrive in the mail, and someone is constantly refining the game plan to improve pain management.  I am so grateful we had so many friends who understood about the benefits of hospice and encouraged us to begin immediately.  What a gift it has been!

Michael eventually moved to Levine & Dickson Hospice House – Huntersville and spent his last days there.  The transition of his care was seamless and Lori maintains that without the support of her hospice team early on, she wouldn’t have had the courage to fight for comfort care over curative care.  She would have missed out on some of the most wonderful moments she ever had with her husband — namely slow-dancing with him in their newly-renovated kitchen, a project Michael undertook during the months he was under hospice care.  He died exactly a week after that last dance. 

So do you see what I mean?  How frustrating this is?  Hospice care is not meant to be a “best kept secret”.  We don’t want it to be some sort of exclusive “club” where more members reduce its appeal.  We want everyone to benefit from this exceptional service.

If you know what I’m talking about, I hope you’ll join us on our conceptual roof.  Maybe we can shatter those misconceptions about hospice at last.  Maybe, just maybe, if we all shout loud enough, we can finally be heard.  I’m willing to get a little hoarse.  Are you?